CCB 3000

Bioaerosol calibration chamber for comparing bioaerosol collection systems with high precision

Bioaerosol calibration chamber for comparing bioaerosol collection systems with high precision

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CCB 3000

Bioaerosol calibration chamber for comparing bioaerosol collection systems with high precision

Description

The name CCB 3000 stands for Calibration Chamber for Bioaerosol Measuring Devices. The bioaerosol calibration chamber was first realized by Palas® at the suggestion of Prof. Joseph Strauss from AIT Tulln (Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH) and is used successfully at AIT to this day.

The CCB 3000 complies with the requirements from the latest VDI 4258 guideline, which is currently under preparation. The guideline describes various chambers and testing channels for characterizing and comparing bioaerosol generator and collector systems.

Aerosols from different starting materials can be used in the bioaerosol calibration chamber. Various dusts (Arizona test dust, wood dust, dust from agricultural operations) and suspensions (fungal and bacterial suspensions) have been used successfully in the CCB 3000. In the field of fungal and bacterial spores, it was possible to introduce and collect spores that are viable and capable of colony formation.

The bioaerosol calibration chamber was tested for uniformity of particle distribution within the test space. Particle concentration and size distribution was measured over the surface at nine points (see Fig. 2) and at three different heights (7, 31 and 45 cm above the base plate).
The uniformity of concentration was therefore measured at a total of 27 measurement points.

The CCB 3000 was developed for validating bioaerosol collection devices with each other. As part of a project from AIT and the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU), it was possible to test the collection efficiency of various bioaerosol collection devices (impaction, centrifugal impaction, impingement, filtration, cyclone collection technology) in the chamber. Seven different devices were successfully compared with each other using aerosols from fungal and bacterial spores.

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Fig. 1: Measurement positions to investigate particle concentration distribution in a plane

Benefits

  • Proofed constancy of the particle distribution in the test space
  • Use of aerosols from different starting materials like dusts (Arizona test dust, wood dust, dust from agricultural operations) and suspensions (fungal and bacterial suspensions) possible
  • Introducing/Collecting of fungal and bacterial spores that are viable and capable of colony formation

Datasheet

Volume flow 70 m^3 /h
Dimensions 79 • 120 • 60 cm (H • W • D, test space)
Underpressure -160 Pa (inner space)

Applications

  • Characterizing and comparing of bioaerosol generators and collection systems